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Will HTMX Take Away Front End Developer Jobs? with Jack Herrington cover image

Will HTMX Take Away Front End Developer Jobs? with Jack Herrington

Jack Herrington talks with Tracy Lee on the latest trends in JavaScript development and developer culture. They talk about evolving web development tools and philosophies and the abstractions that come with these new frameworks. Jack and Tracy talk about the potential of HTMX and Astro, highlighting trends towards simplicity in tech and the role of client-side libraries like HTMX in bridging front-end and back-end development. Download this episode here!...

Transitioning From Engineer to Manager with Emma Bostian, Engineering Manager at Spotify cover image

Transitioning From Engineer to Manager with Emma Bostian, Engineering Manager at Spotify

Tracy Lee interviews Emma Bostian, an engineering manager at Spotify, about her transition from being an engineer to a manager. Emma discusses the challenges she faced in her new role and how managers can provide autonomy and support to those transitioning. One of the key challenges Emma highlights is measuring productivity as a manager. Emma also encourages managers to seek help when needed and emphasizes the importance of collaboration and continuous learning in this role. Time management is another aspect Emma shares strategies on that she has tried, such as batching meetings and saying no to some, to create larger blocks of focus time. Emma also emphasizes the importance of understanding individual motivations and assessing the skills and interests of team members to match them with projects that align with their goals. Emma also discusses the reasons why some people transition back to being individual contributors from engineering management. She mentions that some individuals miss coding or have different expectations from the role. Download this episode here!...

The Art of Feedback and Blameless Cultures with Kelly Vaughn cover image

The Art of Feedback and Blameless Cultures with Kelly Vaughn

Kelly Vaughn, Director of Engineering at Spot AI discusses the intricacies of engineering leadership and management. The conversation revolves around the importance of feedback in personal and professional growth For those giving feedback, she stresses the significance of timely and specific feedback that focuses on actionable steps for improvement. She emphasizes creating a culture that embraces failure and critical feedback. Both Rob and Kelly acknowledge the challenges of giving and receiving feedback, highlighting the importance of mutual respect and a team-oriented approach. They also discuss leading teams without a manager title, emphasizing the impact that individual contributors can have on a team. Download this episode here!...

Deploying Next.js Applications to Fly.io cover image

Deploying Next.js Applications to Fly.io

Fly.io has gained significant popularity in the developer community recently, particularly after being endorsed by Kent C. Dodds for hosting his Epic Web project. It's a go-to choice for hobby projects, thanks to its starting plans that are effectively free, making it highly accessible for individual developers. While Next.js applications are often deployed to Vercel, Fly.io has emerged as a perfectly viable alternative, offering robust hosting solutions and global deployment capabilities. In this blog post, we'll give an overview of how to install a Next.js app to Fly.io, mentioning any gotchas you should be aware of along the way. The Project Our project is a simple Next.js project using the latest version of Next.js at the time of the writing (14). It uses the app directory and integrates with Spotify to get a list of episodes for our podcast, Modern Web. The bulk of the logic is in the page.tsx file, shown below, which represents the front page that is server-rendered after retrieving a list of episodes from Spotify. ` The getEpisodes is a custom function that is a wrapper around the Spotify API. It uses the Spotify client ID and secret (provided through the SPOTIFY_CLIENT_ID and SPOTIFY_CLIENT_SECRET environment variables, respectively) to get an access token from Spotify and invoke a REST endpoint to get a list of episodes for the given show ID. As can be seen from the above code, the Home is an async, server-rendered component. Scaffolding of Fly.io Configuration To get started with Fly.io and deploy a new project using flyctl, you need to go through a few simple steps: installing the flyctl CLI, logging into Fly.io, and using the flyctl launch command. Installing the CLI Installing flyctl is different depending on the operating system you use: - If you're on Windows, the easiest way to install flyctl is by using scoop, a command-line installer. First, install scoop if you haven’t already, then run scoop install flyctl in your command prompt or PowerShell. - For macOS users, you can use Homebrew, a popular package manager. Simply open your terminal and run brew install superfly/tap/flyctl. - Linux users can install flyctl by running the following script in the terminal: curl -L https://fly.io/install.sh | sh. This will download and install the latest version. Logging In After installing flyctl, the next step is to log in to your Fly.io account. Open your terminal or command prompt and enter flyctl auth login. This command will open a web browser prompting you to log in to Fly.io. If you don’t have an account, you can create one at this step. Once you're logged in through the browser, the CLI will automatically be authenticated. Scaffolding the Fly.io Configuration The next step is to use fly launch to add all the necessary files for deployment, such as a Dockerfile and a fly.toml file, which is the main Fly.io configuration file. This command initiates a few actions: - It detects your application type and proposes a configuration. - It sets up your application on Fly.io, including provisioning a new app name if you don’t specify one. - It allows you to select a region to deploy to. There are really many to choose from, so you can get really picky here. Once the process completes, flyctl will be ready for deploying the application. In our case, the process went like this: ` Deploying Now, if this was a simpler Next.js app without any environment variables, running flyctl deploy would build the Docker image in a specialized "builder" app container on Fly.io and deploy that image to the app container running the app. However, in our case, executing flyctl deploy will fail: ` This is because our page is statically rendered, and the Next.js build process attempts to run Home, our server-rendered component to cache its output. Before we can do this, we need to add our environment variables so that Fly.io is aware of them, but this is somewhat a tricky subject, so let's explain why in the following chapter. Handling of Secrets Most complex web apps will need some secrets injected into the app via environment variables. Environment variables are a good way to inject sensitive information, such as API secret keys, to your web app without storing them in the repository, the file system, or any other unprotected place. Unlike other providers such as the previously mentioned Vercel, Fly.io distinguishes built-time and run-time secrets, which are then injected as environment variables. Build-time secrets are those secrets that your app requires to build itself, while run-time secrets are needed while the app is running. In our case, due to the fact that Next.js will attempt to cache our static pages upfront, the Spotify client ID and client secret are needed during both build-time and run-time (after the cache expires). Build-Time Secrets Our Next.js app is built while building the Docker image, therefore build-time secrets should be passed to the Docker context. The recommended, Docker-way of doing this, is through Docker's build-time secrets, which are added through a special --mount=type=secret flag to the RUN command that builds the site. This is a relatively newer feature that allows you to securely pass secrets needed during the build process without including them in the final image or even as an intermediate layer. This means that, instead of having the following build command in our Dockerfile: ` we will have: ` Now, you can either modify the Dockerfile manually and add this, or you can use a helpful little utility called dockerfile: ` If we were using docker build to build our image, we would pass the secret values like so: ` However, in our case we use fly deploy, which is just a wrapper around docker build. To pass the secrets, we would use the following command: ` And now, the app builds and deploys successfully in a few minutes. To summarize, if you have any secrets which are necessary at build-time, they will need to be provided to the fly deploy command. This means that if you have a CI/CD pipeline, you will need to make sure that these secrets are available to your CI/CD platform. In the case of GitHub actions, they would need to be stored in your repository's secrets. Run-Time Secrets Run-time secrets are handled in a different way - you need to provide them to Fly.io via the fly secrets set command: ` Now, you might be wondering why fly deploy cannot use these secrets if they are already stored in Fly.io. The architecture of Fly.io is set up in such a way that reading these secrets through the API, once they are set, is not possible. Secrets are stored in an encrypted vault. When you set a secret using fly secrets set, it sends the secret value through the Fly.io API, which writes it to the vault for your specific Fly.io app. The API servers can only encrypt; they cannot decrypt secret values. Therefore, the fly deploy process, which is, if you remember, just a wrapper around docker build, cannot access the decrypted secret values. Other Things to Consider Beware of .env Files In Next.js, you can use .env as well as .env.local for storing environment variable values for local development. However, keep in mind that only .env.local files are ignored by the Docker build process via the .dockerignore file generated by Fly.io. This means that if you happen to be using an .env file, this file could be bundled into your Docker image, which is potentially a security risk if it contains sensitive information. To prevent this from happening, be sure to add .env to your .dockerignore file as well. Not Enough Memory? For larger Next.js sites, you might run into situations where the memory of your instance is simply not enough to run the app, especially if you are on the hobby plan. If that happens, you have two options. The first one does not incur any additional costs, and it involves increasing the swap size. This is not ideal, as more disk operation is involved, making the entire process slower, but it is good enough if you don't have any other options. To set swap size to something like 512 MB, you need to add the following line to the fly.toml file near the top: ` The second one is increasing memory size of your instance. This does incur additional cost, however. If you decide to use this option, the command to use is: ` For example, to increase RAM memory to 1024 MB, you would use the command: ` After making the changes, you can try redeploying and seeing if the process is still crashing due to lack of memory. Conclusion In conclusion, deploying Next.js applications to Fly.io offers a flexible and robust solution for developers looking for alternatives to more commonly used platforms like Vercel. We hope this blog post has provided you with some useful insights on the things to consider when doing so. Be sure to also check out our Next starter templates on starter.dev if you'd like to integrate a few other frameworks into your Next.js project. The entire source code for this project is available on Stackblitz....

AI (Probably) Won’t Ruin Your Engineering Career with Ben Lesh, Adam Rackis, & Tracy Lee cover image

AI (Probably) Won’t Ruin Your Engineering Career with Ben Lesh, Adam Rackis, & Tracy Lee

In this episode of the Modern Web Podcast, hosts Tracy Lee, Ben Lesh, and Adam Rackis kick things off by discussing the progress of observables landing in the browser and the potential impact it could have on the use of RXJS. As developers, we're always on the lookout for new tools and technologies that can make our lives easier, and observables in the browser certainly have the potential to do just that. They talk about whether or not you should listen to your “customers” or have a strong vision that you want to push forward, like Ryan Carniato and his approach with Solid and Signals. The three also talk about AI tools, such as GPT and Co-Pilot, and how they are shaping the future of coding and ideation. Finally, Ben, Adam, and Tracy briefly touch on the potential impact of automation on job roles and the outsourcing of tech jobs. While automation can streamline certain tasks, it's important to remember that human creativity and problem-solving skills are irreplaceable. Download this episode here!...

Level up your REST API's with JSON Schema cover image

Level up your REST API's with JSON Schema

Explore JSON Schema, a powerful tool for ensuring data consistency and interoperability in REST APIs....

Ethical Design for AI with Dr. Christine Dee at IBM cover image

Ethical Design for AI with Dr. Christine Dee at IBM

Dr. Christine Dee is a technologist and research psychologist for IBM, focusing on AI ethics. She reflects on her decade-long experience with AI and the evolving landscape of AI technologies. She highlights the challenges of AI and the increasing focus on open AI, emphasizing the need for more structured conversations around trust, ethics, and responsibility in AI. There is a widespread adoption of AI across various industries and the growing interest in AI, particularly generative AI like ChatGPT. Christine emphasizes the importance of companies needing to understand the specific technologies, different layers of AI, and the associated risks and safeguards. The two discuss the challenges leaders face in navigating AI conversations within their teams and organizations. Dr. Christine shares insights into design thinking, and the principles as well as systematic approaches to designing AI solutions that align with organizational values and how to do so. Host Rob Ocel brings up the broader context of trust in society, beyond AI, referencing the challenges in trusting information sources, especially in an era of polarization. Download this episode here!...

Intro to DevRel: 5 Reasons Why DevRel Teams Fail cover image

Intro to DevRel: 5 Reasons Why DevRel Teams Fail

Although Developer Relations (DevRel) defies traditional marketing strategies, prioritizing enhancing developer satisfaction ahead of promoting numbers that contribute to a sales funnel, it is still possible for DevRel teams to fail at delivering desired business objectives. And unfortunately, more often than not, this leads to the dissolution of DevRel efforts, and sometimes even role elimination. Below, I’ve compiled a list of five of the top reasons why DevRel teams fail. 1. Lack of Leadership Buy-In DevRel requires buy-in and support from executives and stakeholders within the company. Without buy-in, being able to work cross-functionally across the organization, get access to data needed for measuring success, have the ability to influence change within the organization, or get the budget for necessary activities to engage developers will be impossible. I asked Jason Lengstorf, the host and founder of Learn With Jason and previously on the Developer Relations team at Netlify and Gatsby, where he has seen companies fail at DevRel before: “Companies that want to invest in DevRel can collect as many well-known developers as they can, but giving them zero dollars and zero autonomy will force teams to rage quit or become content farms because that’s all you can do with no budget.” Other examples are departments not willing to share or give data that helps enable DevRel to understand the metrics they need to effectively baseline and track the success of their efforts. By not doing so, the DevRel team will not be able to justify their work to leadership, which will lead to those positions being cut first when budget cuts come around. Chris Woodruff, Founder of Advocatus, a Developer Relations consultancy, says “DevRel is seeing a lot of layoffs. It’s the easiest team for management to let go because they don’t fully understand the ROI and metrics. These are the holy grails of DevRel, and because they do not understand, they will always be the first teams to let go if management can’t see the actual return or how it affects the bottom line.” 2. Company Culture Fit If an organization's culture does not value collaboration and resists the presence of a DevRel team, DevRel will not be able to effectively advocate for developers or help teams be more successful with their target audience. Francesco Tisiot, Senior Developer Advocate at Aiven, an open-source data platform that makes setting up cloud databases simple, shared one of his experiences in his Developer Relations career. “I was one of the first DevRel hires in a company and we were in the marketing organization. Initially, there was pushback from engineering and product teams on our product feedback and feature requests since we weren't seen as experts. But, DevRel is about breaking barriers and building bridges, so, in leading by example, we demonstrated our technical knowledge and now have a strong impact on all the teams.” Michael Liendo, Senior Developer Advocate at AWS, an online platform by Amazon that provides scalable and cost-effective cloud computing solutions, shared how he was able to find the company culture fit within organizations he has served in the past. Being in a position of Developer Advocacy, and quite literally trying to advocate for developers that use the platform, he says, “Some of the biggest challenges for DevRel are actually internal. Engineers at many companies often focus on one piece of the product. As they're testing features, they may be creating workarounds without realizing they're workarounds. This means they often miss what a proper Developer Experience flow looks like. I've had to push for them to include me in design meetings, and get them to understand that I'm the Lorax--I speak for the community! A phrase I have been known to say is ‘this solves the problem, but it's not a solution’. I'm known for having a high bar for what is considered ‘good enough’ and though the end result is accumulated trust, it's a challenge to get there.” 3. Operating in Isolation DevRel cannot operate in isolation without integration with development, marketing, product teams, sales, or a subset of these. The team will struggle to make a significant impact. DevRel requires a collaborative approach and alignment and synergy with other teams. Francesco Ciulla, Developer Advocate at daily.dev, a professional network for developers that provides the latest tech news and articles, shares his thoughts on how DevRel organizations can be successful within larger organizations: “DevRel organizations can thrive within larger organizations by establishing clear communication channels and fostering meaningful collaborations. They must align their objectives with the company's goals and illustrate their value by sharing tangible outcomes from developer engagement.” 4. Lack of Strategy Proceeding into DevRel without a clear strategy will make it difficult for a DevRel team to establish its purpose within an organization and set priorities that will make an impact. There will not be a clear vision the team can drive towards, leading to wasted efforts and the inability to produce tangible outcomes. If DevRel does not have any goals set, they can only do their best to assume what efforts they should invest in to provide value to the organization. Worst yet, if they do not have any goals set, they may not choose to focus on providing value to the organization, but to a community that the organization has no interest in. Many DevRel experts have seen this happen time and time again in the community, and are always left scratching our heads. Many times, the “strategy” for an organization is to hire DevRel, but that is where the strategy stops. Decision-makers want DevRel professionals to come in and just “do what they do best”. Unfortunately, when decision-makers say this, they typically have an idea of what outcomes they want DevRel to drive, but don’t want to share those thoughts because they feel like DevRel professionals should know what to do. Expectations left open to interpretation often lead to a poor impression of the performance of the DevRel team by decision-makers, and those teams are never able to establish a sense of trust or direction within that organization. Jeremy Meiss, former Director of Developer Relations at CircleCI, says, “One of the biggest problems we have seen in this industry is the startups that were counseled by their VC, founders, or board that they need a DevRel team because the other similar companies had one and it was great for them. They push for it, and one of the early hires is DevRel. Generally, that DevRel hire is someone relatively new in the industry, so you can coax them to start at a new company without clear goals or objectives. New hires like this come in without a lot of experience in the field of DevRel and have not experienced it at different levels of companies. They are heavily pushed by marketing, the CEO, the CTO, and other departments into thinking DevRel should look a certain way, but don’t have the foundational knowledge to be able to push back because they are not yet in this area.” Jeremy’s illustrative explanation of why a lack of strategy ultimately results in the failure of a DevRel team within an organization is one that is common across many devtool startups that have popped up in recent years. 5. Lack of Metrics and Reporting A well-rounded set of DevRel metrics typically comes from multiple areas of the organization, whether that be marketing, sales, product, customer success, or customer support. Without free access to cross-functional team data, it is difficult to show the value and ROI of DevRel. Establishing a baseline set of metrics if you’re new within an organization, or understanding the baseline metrics that currently exist is critical in ensuring the success of your job in DevRel. Tessa Mero, Head of Developer Relations at Appwrite, has a very specific set of metrics her team focuses on. She shared a few of those metrics: - Growth of our GitHub Repo (stars) - Growth of our Discord Community - Improved engagement in Discord community - Growth of our Twitter followers and engagement - Growth of our Appwrite Cloud developers - Number of views or impressions on any video and written content, whether it's internal or externally created - Amount of content created weekly (written or video) - Number of projects created with Appwrite for Hackathon sponsorships - Number of attendees / questions at a conference talk - Number of connections at conferences - Number of community support questions answered, improving rate of responses AND rate of how fast we respond, in all public forums - Number of support tickets responded to - Number of community feedback taken and moved into our DX/Product discussions - Number of feedback from UI/UX perspectives and working with design team to follow up with the devs/users with what we did with the feedback - Number of engagement/activity from our Appwrite heroes/ambassadors This is just one example of and a subset of metrics a DevRel team should consider tracking, but what you track and how you track it is dependent on your goals and the product. Metrics and what your leadership considers a good ROI can vary greatly from organization to organization. I spoke to another Developer Relations expert in the industry and she shared her experience with the company she just left and the reason she left - and it was focused around metrics. She was initially interested in joining the team because of the lack of metrics. However, over time, as she got more experience and as she became more visible, her workload became difficult to prioritize. Since there were no metrics, there were no objectives to measure against to say what was good and what was bad. She felt like she didn’t know what she was doing well or not doing well. Once metrics began to be implemented, the company started pushing her to do more, and she had nothing to push back with because the high-level goals were not there. There was no way to prioritize the workload. The company started tracking things like page hits, unique visitors, unique views of videos, number of subscribers, activity on twitter, and other similar numbers, but it was hard to tie any of these back to the ROI for the company. How do you quantify and determine if 100 new subscribers on YouTube is better than 100 new subscribers on twitter? If you can’t quantify it, how do you prioritize it? What Successful DevRel Teams Do Differently With the nature of DevRel and the multitude of levers and factors that determine success and failure, it’s important to allow space for a team or set of individuals to experiment and iterate before making judgment calls. One company that serves millions of developers on its platform is starting up a new meetup program and testing the ROI of sponsoring meetups around the world. Since they are in the testing and experimentation phase, they don’t yet know how to measure success, and that is clear to leadership. The current strategy is sponsoring local meetups for a few months and seeing what the result is. Why are they so seemingly laid back in their approach? Is it the right approach? The reason for the relaxed nature of the testing phase is that they don’t want to be pushy to the meetup organizer to find something out or measure something. They are not expecting anything, but will evaluate what metrics they could use to establish success criteria. This approach is a thoughtful and empathetic one, and clearly, the DevRel team has an understanding of how to approach community members in a way that will not turn them off. Internally, the simple numbers they are looking at are the number of RSVPs, the number of attendees that show up, and the difference between the two. DevRel is naturally iterative and requires a team to experiment, test, and refine their strategies. Effectively engaging developers is not black and white, and a strategy that works for one community or company may not necessarily work for another. Furthermore, building domain expertise and gaining a deep understanding of the developer community they serve takes time. Experimentation and iteration help teams refine their knowledge, identify patterns, and develop strategies that resonate with developers. This expertise becomes an asset in driving long-term success. It’s also important to acknowledge that building domain expertise within a segment as well as building relationships and trust with developers in that segment takes time. The technology landscape changes quickly and new technologies are being released weekly. Developer sentiment is fickle and changes just as quickly regarding favored approaches and products. That being said, the above pitfalls remain common causes for DevRel teams to fail, and by remaining mindful of and vigilant against them, DevRel teams both new and old can succeed in supporting key business objectives like developer retention, community growth, and product development....

New Core Web Vitals and How They Work cover image

New Core Web Vitals and How They Work

A guide to INP, the new Core Web Vital coming in March 2024. The what, why and how....

Side Projects Make You a Better Leader and Human with Cory Minton, Field CTO at Splunk cover image

Side Projects Make You a Better Leader and Human with Cory Minton, Field CTO at Splunk

Cory Minton, the Field CTO at Splunk joins Rob Ocel in an episode that revolves around how to be a better engineering leader, intentionality, and what we can all do to be better humans. Cory is a Field CTO at Splunk, where he engages with the company's largest and most significant customers, addressing challenges in cybersecurity, IT operations, and observability. He talks about the importance of combining technology expertise with business acumen to help leaders make informed decisions. A major highlight of Cory's role is his involvement with McLaren. He details how Splunk and McLaren work together to leverage data and technology for competitive advantage in Formula One and Esports. Cory shares his excitement about contributing to the development of in-race analytics for McLaren's Esports team. Cory talks about how he encourages his team to pursue passion projects and personal interests. Cory emphasizes intentionality and encourages individuals to identify their interests, align them with their job functions, and intentionally spend time on side projects that contribute to personal and professional growth. He emphasizes the significance of diverse experiences and interests, making individuals more dynamic and engaging. The conversation touches on the importance of balance, acknowledging the human aspect in the workplace. Cory advocates for cycles of high-performance work interspersed with periods of lower intensity to prevent burnout. Cory provides insights for those who may struggle to connect personal passions with their work. He suggests viewing such situations as opportunities for growth and skill development, encouraging listeners to manifest their desired future by investing in themselves. Listen to the full podcast episode here!...

Exploring the Hidden Gems of the Next Image Component: What You Might Be Overlooking cover image

Exploring the Hidden Gems of the Next Image Component: What You Might Be Overlooking

A blog post that explores hidden features that are easy to overlook...

A Solid(JS) Developer Experience with Atila Fassina, Solid DX Team cover image

A Solid(JS) Developer Experience with Atila Fassina, Solid DX Team

Rob Ocel sits down with Atila Fassina, a Developer Relations Engineer at Crabbula and a member of the Developer Experience team for SolidJS. Atila's involvement with SolidJS began after a conversation with Ryan Carniato, the creator of the framework. He was immediately drawn to the framework's plans and its focus. Atila expresses his excitement about the upcoming release of SolidJS and Tauri V2. Atila and Rob discuss the significance of comprehensive documentation in software development. Atila emphasizes the need for well-written documentation that caters to both beginners and experienced developers. He mentions the ongoing efforts to improve the documentation for SolidJS, providing developers with the resources they need to understand the framework and troubleshoot issues. The conversation also explores the challenges of introducing new concepts and paradigms to the developer community. Listen to the full podcast episode here!...